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PROMINENT INCIDENTS

Updated: Jun 2, 2023

HMS ATLANTA - On January 31, 1880, the HMS Atalanta (formerly HMS Juno) and its entire crew disappeared during their journey from the Royal Naval Dockyard in Bermuda to Falmouth, England. It is believed that a violent storm crossed the ship's planned route and caused it to sink. The crew, consisting mostly of inexperienced trainees, may have played a role in the tragedy. The search for information regarding the fate of the ship garnered significant global attention. Despite later claims linking the incident to the Bermuda Triangle, extensive research conducted by author David Francis Raine in 1997 definitively refuted this association. It should be noted that this occurrence is frequently compared to the 1878 sinking of the training ship HMS Eurydice, which also sailed from the Royal Naval Dockyard in Bermuda for Portsmouth.


USS CYCLOPS - In a tragic incident involving the collier Cyclops, the US Navy suffered its largest non-combat loss of life. After leaving Barbados sometime after March 4, 1918, the ship inexplicably disappeared with its 309 crew aboard while hauling a full load of manganese ore and experiencing engine issues. There are several different, independently developed ideas about what caused the disappearance, including theories about storms, capsizing, and possible enemy activities during a conflict. Also lost in the North Atlantic during World War II were Cyclops' sister ships, Proteus and Nereus, which were both hauling similar heavy metallic ore loads. It is generally accepted that the structural failure brought on by overloading the ships with a cargo denser than their design capacity was the most likely reason for their sinkings.


CARROLL A. DEERING - The Carroll A. Deering, a five-masted schooner built in 1919, was found grounded and abandoned on January 31, 1921, at Diamond Shoals, close to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The FBI looked into the incident and investigated a number of theories on the ship's abandonment. Theoretical scenarios taken into consideration included piracy, Communist sabotage at home, and the involvement of illegal alcohol traffickers. But after a close examination, the inquiry ruled out these scenarios.


STAR TIGER and STAR ARIEL - The Star Tiger aeroplane, registered G-AHNP, disappeared on January 30, 1948, while on route from the Azores to Bermuda. Similar events occurred on January 17, 1949, when the Star Ariel aeroplane, registered G-AGRE, vanished while on route from Bermuda to Kingston, Jamaica. These were passenger Avro Tudor IV aircraft being flown by British South American Airways. Because both flights were operating at the extremes of their range, even a slight error or technical issue may prohibit them from making it to the small island.


DOUGLAS DC-3 - On December 28, 1948, while en route from San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Miami, the Douglas DC-3 with the registration number NC16002 disappeared without a trace. Despite extensive searches, neither the aeroplane nor the 32 people within were ever found. The Civil Aeronautics Board's investigation came to the conclusion that there was insufficient material to determine the likely reason of the disappearance.


KC-135 STRATOTANKERS - On December 28, 1948, while en route from San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Miami, the Douglas DC-3 with the registration number NC16002 disappeared without a trace. Despite extensive searches, neither the aeroplane nor the 32 people within were ever found. The Civil Aeronautics Board's investigation came to the conclusion that there was insufficient material to determine the likely reason of the disappearance.




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